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How Yogic Nasal Breathing Can Slow Down Your Brain Waves

yoga has become a modern way of regaining health and connecting to one’s inner peace. Recent studies suggest that a daily practise of 25 minutes has an enormous effect on both mental and physical states of being.
Pranayama is also known as breath control. It’s the part of yoga that focuses on the breath. Regulating the breath modifies the thought process.

Nasal Breathing or Anulom Velom stands for extended inhalation and exhalation through the nasal cavities. Retention plays an important role as well. It’s the moment when you hold your breath.
Now, how does the breath affect your brain?

There are different types of breathing. When we are angry, we breathe very fast. When we are sad, we breathe very slowly. Different emotions and actions bring along a changed pattern of breath.
In modern society, we tend to breathe very fast and short due to stress. This is not healthy at all and permits a good oxygen intake.

In Yoga, we modify and deepen the breath. Inhaling very deeply and consciously results in a better oxygen intake. Retention or the hold of breath extends the absorption period for the alveoli inside the lungs. A slow and conscious exhalation releases accumulated carbon dioxide from the body.

Nasal Breathing slows down the brain waves as the brain is strongly connected with all parts of the body. Breathing with awareness and releasing carbon dioxide, unnecessary components of the body detoxifies the cells and tissues. The increased oxygen intake spreads all over the body and sends rejuvenating signals to the brain.
When the body is oxygenized properly, the brain waves automatically slow down. The result is: you feel more calm, energetic and relaxed.

Anulom Velom is one type of pranayama or Nasal Breathing in Yoga which can help you to achieve health and inner peace.

There are more than 12 other techniques including Brahmari Pranayam and Diaphragmic Breath.
To learn yogic breathing or Pranayama in-depth, it’s recommended to study at a yoga training school.

Author Bio:
Linnea Ottonson grew up in Gothenburg, Sweden. She started her yogic journey at the young age of 14. At 19, she traveled to Rishikesh, India in search of a professional expertise in yoga, pranayama, and yogic philosophy. She completed her first Yoga Teacher Training at Yoga India Foundation, a well-known yoga ashram in India.
She describes the yoga teacher training experience as transformational and life-shifting.
Since 2012, Linnea works as a holistic yoga teacher and nutritionist in London, UK. She completed another Yoga Teacher Training at Yoga India Foundation in October 2016 to advance her existing knowledge and highly recommends the power of yoga to anyone.

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Tags: Breathing, Nasal, asana, yoga

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